Citizenship Services

The U.S. Embassy in Colombo provides services for U.S. citizens who reside in Sri Lanka and the Maldives.

Please note: There is no walk-in service for U.S. citizens who require a service related to passports, citizenship or birth registration. These services are by appointment only.

What Service Do You Require?

REQUIREMENTS FOR TRANSMISSION OF US CITIZENSHIP AT BIRTH

In order to transmit U.S. citizenship to a child, the U.S. citizen parent(s) must have been a U.S. citizen at the time of the child’s birth and must have accrued sufficient physical presence in the U.S. to transmit citizenship.  The physical presence requirements depend on the child’s date of birth and the marital status of the parents at the time of the child’s birth.

For your child to benefit from US citizenship at the time of birth, US nationality law requires that certain conditions must be met.  The conditions have been modified by legislation over time, but none of the modifications were made retroactive, hence the variations defined here.  Below are the circumstances governing most instances.

Child born to two U.S. citizen parents who are married at the time of birth: A child born outside of the United States or its outlying possessions to two U.S. citizen parents is entitled to citizenship, provided that one of the parents, prior to the birth of the child, had been resident in the United States (the law does not specify a specific length of residence time.)

Child born to an unmarried U.S. Citizen mother:   A child born outside of the United States and out of wedlock to a U.S. Citizen mother is entitled to U.S. citizenship, provided the U.S. Citizen mother had been physically present in the United States for a continuous period of at least one year at some time prior to the birth of her child. (NOTE: The law requires that the U.S. citizen mother must have lived continuously for 1 year in the United States or its outlying possessions. The law further states that periods spent overseas with the U.S. government/military or as a government/military dependent, may NOT be computed as physical presence in the U.S.).

Child born in wedlock to one U.S. citizen parent and one non U.S. citizen parent on or after November 14, 1986:  A child born outside of the United States to one U.S. citizen parent and one non-U.S. citizen parent may be entitled to citizenship provided the U.S. citizen parent, prior to the birth of the child, had been physically present in the United States or one of its outlying possessions for five years, at least two years of which were after s/he reached the age of fourteen.

Child born in wedlock to one U.S. citizen parent and one non-U.S. Citizen parent on December 24, 1952 until November 13, 1986:  A child born outside of the United States to one U.S. Citizen parent and one non-U.S. Citizen parent, may be entitled to citizenship provided the U.S. Citizen parent, prior to the birth of the child, had been physically present in the United States or one of its outlying possessions for a period of ten years, at least five years of which were after s/he reached the age of fourteen.

Child born in wedlock to one U.S. citizen parent and one non-U.S. Citizen parent on July 4, 1946 until December 23, 1952:  A child born outside of the United States to one U.S. Citizen parent and one non-U.S. Citizen parent, may be entitled to citizenship provided the U.S. Citizen parent, prior to the birth of the child, had been physically present in the United States or one of its outlying possessions for a period of ten years, at least five years of which were after s/he reached the age of sixteen.

Child born in wedlock to one U.S. citizen parent and one non-U.S. Citizen parent  on January 13, 1941 until July 3, 1946:  A child born outside of the United States to one U.S. Citizen parent and one non-U.S. Citizen parent, may be entitled to citizenship provided the U.S. Citizen parent, prior to the birth of the child, had been physically present in the United States or its outlying possessions, any time before the applicant’s birth.

Child born in wedlock to one U.S. citizen parent and one non-U.S. Citizen parent before January 13, 1941: A child born outside of the United States to one U.S. Citizen parent and one non-U.S. Citizen parent, may be entitled to citizenship provided the U.S. Citizen parent had, prior to the birth of the child, been physically present in the United States any time before the applicant’s birth.

Child born out of wedlock to a U.S. Citizen father: A child born outside of the United States to a U.S. Citizen father where there is no marriage to the non-American mother is entitled to U.S. Citizenship provided the American citizen father had been physically present in the United States for the period of time as specified in previous paragraphs for children born in wedlock to one U.S. Citizen and one non-U.S. Citizen parent, either before or after November 14, 1986

Overview

Loss of U.S. citizenship is a serious and irrevocable act which deserves your thoughtful consideration.  It is imperative that you fully understand the nature of its consequences prior to requesting a Certificate of Loss of Nationality.  If you decide that this is the course of action you wish to pursue, there are several steps you need to take including arranging an appointment to come into the Embassy to sign the Statement of Understanding, the Loss of Citizenship Questionnaire  and/or the Oath of Renunciation, in the presence of a Consular Officer.  Please note that the Statement of Understanding clearly states that the action you are taking is irrevocable.

Remember that expatriation is a personal right and can never be exercised by another person (including parents and/or legal guardians).

Important Information on the Loss of Nationality Process

Become familiar with legal requirements and possible expatriating acts before beginning this process. Pay particular attention to your right to request an informal initial appointment to discuss your possible loss of citizenship with a consular official over the phone or in-person prior to your final interview.  For questions related to expatriation tax and possible tax implications, please consult with the Internal Revenue Service.

Documents Required (Loss of Citizenship)

You should gather the following documents:

  • Evidence of U.S. citizenship; (such as your most recent U.S. passport or U.S. birth certificate, if you are not in possession of your U.S. passport;
  • S. Consular Report of Birth Abroad, if applicable;
  • Bio-pages of all current foreign passports;
  • Certificates of Naturalization for any country, including the United States, if applicable;
  • Certificates of Citizenship for any country, including the United States, if applicable;
  • Evidence of any name changes, if applicable(for example marriage or divorce certificates, court orders or deed polls);
  • Completed form DS-4079– download the form from the Department of State website

Fees

You will be required to pay a non-refundable fee of $2,350 or equivalent in Sri Lankan rupees.